Dominion Energy devotes itself to a path that benefits everyone: our customers, our communities, our employees, and our shareholders. We understand and appreciate the value of dialogue and collaboration. So we consistently seek out other perspectives to help inform our decisions.

Dominion Energy devotes itself to a path that benefits everyone: our customers, our communities, our employees, and our shareholders. We understand and appreciate the value of dialogue and collaboration. So we consistently seek out other perspectives to help inform our decisions.

Pipeline Routing

We carefully study the effects that our infrastructure projects might have on property owners and others in the vicinity. For example, we spent more than two years conducting an exhaustive review of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline’s route. We listened to input from more than 8,800 attendees at scores of public meetings. We considered views from landowners, local governments, environmentalists, historic preservationists, community activists and others. Based on that information, we adjusted the 600-mile pipeline’s route more than 300 times.

Route Alterations

We have adjusted the route for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline to avoid wetlands, drinking water sources, wildlife habitats, and natural springs.

The adjustments we have made ensure that, where possible, the pipeline route avoids wetlands, public drinking water sources, wildlife habitats, private wells, natural springs, and sensitive karst features such as sinkholes and sinking rivers.

When building infrastructure, we conduct informational meetings in which we engage with community members to answer their questions and learn about their concerns. We work with local government, community groups, and residents to find the best solution with the least impact.

We’re working in partnership with the natural gas transmission industry to clearly define and communicate these closely held commitments to our landowners and communities. In 2017 we worked collaboratively through INGAA (Interstate Natural Gas Association of America) to develop “Commitments to Responsible Pipeline Construction,” which clearly outlines these commitments made in partnership with 26 of our industry peers.

For any infrastructure project, eminent domain remains an absolute last resort. In the case of an interstate natural gas pipeline, it can be used only once a project receives federal approval and only in the relatively small number of cases where an agreement cannot be reached with the landowners. In those cases, a court determines how much landowners should be compensated for the use of their land.

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